Jump to content

  •  

France Passes Bill That Allows Tapping Into Phone Cameras To Solve Crimes


Firewaller

Recommended Posts

rssImage-b35bf3384becf6034cdad905c0d37f56.jpeg

france-passes-bill-to-tap-into-phone-cam Photo 129906453 © Malcolmthe | Dreamstime.com

 

In recent years, it’s been a fairly common concern that government bodies are tapping into the cameras on civilians’ devices to keep an eye on them. If you own a laptop or any other device with a front-facing camera especially, chances are you might have added a piece of tape to ensure that there is no chance anyone is watching you. In France, this might turn into a reality. French lawmakers in the National Assembly have passed a bill that grants expanded surveillance powers to law enforcement agencies to pursue criminals suspected of terror offenses and organized crimes by remotely accession cameras, microphones, and GPS systems on devices. So what does this entail? First, perpetrators must be suspected of crimes that are at least punishable by the law for up to five years. From there, authorities will use the geolocation capabilities to keep track of these culprits via their laptops, cars, and connected devices. The policy must also be approved beforehand by a judge, and tracking must only go on for up to six months. According to the French paper Le Monde, the recently amended bill prevented the use of lawyers, journalists, judges, politicians, and other “sensitive professions.” This has called on the attention of civil liberty groups, like La Quadrature du Net, concerned about whether authorities could use it to target environmental activists and other individuals whose crimes are not serious threats. The advocacy group has also stated that the measure rests on security vulnerabilities in these devices. And instead of reporting a potential security hole, police exploit its use. Justice Minister Éric Dupond-Moretti states that only “dozens” of cases per year will need to employ such surveillance methods. La Quadrature says that this impedes one’s “right to security, right to a private life, and to private correspondence.”

 

 

 

[via Engadget and People’s Gazette, Photo 129906453 © Malcolmthe | Dreamstime.com]

View the full article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.





×
×
  • Create New...
The Creative Network

DesignTAXI

The Creative Finder

The Bazaar

Trendingger (BETA)

Community Resources

Become a member

  • Sign up for free
  • Pro/Business Accounts
  • Log into your account

    Forum Rules & Guidelines

    Terms of Use

    DMCA Copyright Notice

    Privacy Policy

    Cookies

    Contact Us

    Advertise with us

  • Express self-serve ads
  • Other advertising inquiries
  • Popular Categories

  • Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  • Innovation
  • Accessibility
  • Creative Ad Ideas
  • Climate Change & Sustainability
  • Copyright
  • Humor
  • Inclusivity
  • Travel
  • WTF
  • Creative Disciplines

  • 3D
  • AR / VR
  • Architecture
  • Art
  • Automotive
  • Branding
  • Character Design
  • Comics
  • Fashion Design
  • Furniture Design
  • Graphic Design
  • Illustration
  • Industrial Design
  • Interior Design
  • Logo Design
  • Packaging Design
  • Product Design
  • Street Art
  • Typography
  • UI/UX
  • Video Games